jueves, 2 de octubre de 2014

Elder Abuse|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC

Elder Abuse|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC



CDC. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.

Elder Abuse



General Information

Scientific Information

  • Definitions: Consistent definitions are necessary for obtaining accurate and reliable estimates of elder abuse.
  • Data Sources: Data, including the number of violence-related injuries and deaths, help define the magnitude of the problem.
  • Risk & Protective Factors: Risk and protective factors are important considerations in the development of prevention programs.
  • Consequences: Elder abuse can have a devastating impact on victims, families, and communities.
  • Prevention Strategies: Knowledge about what works to prevent elder abuse is growing.
  • Translation: Strategies for distributing prevention information and ensuring widespread adoption within communities.
If you are, or if you suspect that someone you know, is the victim of elder abuse, please call:
National Center on Elder Abuse's Elder Care Locator at 1-800-667-1116.
Visit their Web site for more information.

Suicide|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC

Suicide|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC



Suicide Prevention

Sad womanSuicide is a serious public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities. While its causes are complex and determined by multiple factors, the goal of suicide prevention is simple: Reduce factors that increase risk (i.e. risk factors) and increase factors that promote resilience (i.e. protective factors). Ideally, prevention addresses all levels of influence: individual, relationship, community, and societal. Effective prevention strategies are needed to promote awareness of suicide and encourage a commitment to social change.

Data & Statistics

U.S.A. map of suicide statistics
National Suicide Statistics through 2009

Youth Violence|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC

Youth Violence|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC



Youth Violence

boy looking sadYouth violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young person can be a victim, an offender, or a witness to the violence.
Youth violence includes various behaviors. Some violent acts—such as bullying, slapping, or hitting—can cause more emotional harm than physical harm. Others, such as robbery and assault (with or without weapons) can lead to serious injury or even death.
The ultimate goal is to stop youth violence before it starts. Several prevention strategies have been identified.

Sexual Violence Home Page|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC

Sexual Violence Home Page|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC



Sexual Violence

Sexual violence (SV) is a serious, preventable public health problemSexual Violence is a significant problem in the United States. SV refers to sexual activity where consent is not obtained or freely given. Anyone can experience SV, but most victims are female. The person responsible for the violence is typically male and is usually someone known to the victim. The person can be, but is not limited to, a friend, coworker, neighbor, or family member.
CDC uses a 4-step approach to address public health problems like sexual violence:
  1. Define the problem
  2. Identify risk and protective factors
  3. Develop and test prevention strategies
  4. Assure widespread adoption
The ultimate goal is to stop sexual violence before it begins.

Global Violence|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC

Global Violence|Violence Prevention|Injury Center|CDC



CDC Helps Prevent Global Violence

International Vision

A global community free from violence

International Mission

To collaborate on global efforts to prevent violence by developing and disseminating science-based knowledge and practice
Violence causes more than 1.6 million deaths worldwide every year.1 More than 90% of these occur in low- and middle-income countries.1 Violence is one of the leading causes of death in all parts of the world for persons ages 15 to 44.1 But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working to change that. CDC is committed to building a world free of violence.
CDC conducts research on violence, its causes, and effective prevention strategies. Studies have shown there are personal, peer, family, and social factors that may increase or reduce the chances that a person will become a victim or perpetrator of violence. CDC and its partners use this science-based information to help agencies and governments around the world develop programs to prevent violence-related injuries and deaths.

Violence Against Children Survey

A young boy with his hand on a globeCDC's Violence against Children Surveys (VACS) measure physical, emotional, and sexual violence against girls and boys. Find out more about VACS use in 14 countries.

References

  1. Krug EG et al., eds. World report on violence and health. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2002.
  2. Injuries and violence: the facts. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2010.