miércoles, 27 de agosto de 2014

Media Availability: HIV Antibodies Block Infection by Reservoir-Derived Virus in Laboratory Study

Media Availability: HIV Antibodies Block Infection by Reservoir-Derived Virus in Laboratory Study



Tae-Wook Chun, Ph.D.

Tae-Wook Chun, Ph.D., staff scientist in the NIAID Laboratory of Immunoregulation and first author of the study.
Credit: NIAID
View larger image.




HIV Antibodies Block Infection by Reservoir-Derived Virus in Laboratory Study
A laboratory study led by NIAID scientists lends further weight to the potential effectiveness of passive immunotherapy to suppress HIV in the absence of drug treatment. Passive immunotherapy for HIV is an experimental strategy that involves periodically administering broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies to control the virus.

CDC - NCHHSTP Newsroom

CDC - NCHHSTP Newsroom



New CDC Campaign Encourages Latinos to Talk Openly about HIV

Today CDC announced We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time, a new national, bilingual communication campaign encouraging Latinos to talk openly about HIV with their with families and friends.
For your stories about the new campaign, please find below a press release, as well as other useful background resources on the campaign and on HIV.
Primary Materials
Related Materials

Recent News Releases and Announcements



NHTD 2014 Statement| Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC

NHTD 2014 Statement| Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC



Statement



NATIONAL HIV TESTING DAY 2014 (JUNE 27)

CDC Recommends New HIV Testing Approach to Diagnose Infection Earlier

Statement from Dr. Jonathan Mermin
Director, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention



Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH 
Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH
National HIV Testing Day offers an opportunity to reflect on the pivotal role that HIV testing plays in our nation’s ever-expanding prevention toolkit. Since National HIV Testing Day was first observed in 1995, we’ve seen tremendous advances in HIV prevention, ranging from daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV acquisition, to antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV to prevent transmission.
HIV testing is the linchpin for prevention and treatment. For people who test HIV-positive, diagnosis opens the door to life-saving treatment, which also reduces the risk of transmitting HIV to others. For those who test negative, knowing their status empowers them to remain HIV-free.
However, more than half of American adults still have never been tested for HIV. Nearly 1 in 6 people living with HIV in the United States do not know they have HIV, meaning that they are missing out on essential care and may unknowingly transmit the virus. Roughly half of the estimated 50,000 new HIV infections each year are transmitted by people who don’t know that they are HIV-positive.
At the same time, the nation is making steady progress on HIV testing, just as we have in the development of new prevention options. Since CDC recommended HIV testing for all Americans aged 13-64 in 2006, the proportion of people who are unaware of their HIV infection has declined steadily, from approximately 20 percent to 16 percent. And just today, CDC issued important new guidance that could help the nation reduce that number further.
Today, CDC is recommending a new approach for HIV testing in laboratories that capitalizes on the latest technology to improve diagnosis of acute infection, the earliest stage of HIV infection when people are most likely to transmit the virus. Identifying acute infections has long been one of our nation’s biggest HIV prevention challenges, since these infections eluded traditional testing technologies. But with consistent and widespread use of this new testing method, we can diagnose people several weeks earlier than before. CDC is supporting laboratories to adopt this new approach as quickly as possible.
HIV testing is fast, easy and empowering. On National HIV Testing Day, I urge all Americans to take the test and take control of their health.
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YRBS 2014 | Press Release | Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC

YRBS 2014 | Press Release | Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC



Press Release

For immediate release: Thursday, July 17, 2014
Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov

Only 1 in 5 sexually experienced U.S. students ever tested for HIV



Progress on decreasing sexual risk behaviors differs by race and gender


Photo: Group of teenagers

Only 22 percent of sexually experienced U.S. high school students have ever been tested for HIV, even though young people account for a disproportionate share of new infections, researchers for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will report at the 2014 International AIDS Conference.
Female and black students were more likely to be tested than male students and other racial/ethnic groups, but HIV testing among all groups of adolescents remains low, the CDC analysis found.
“This analysis offers a mixed progress report on sexual risk among U.S. high school students – we’ve seen substantial progress in some areas, but risk persists in others,” said Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention. “It is clear that HIV testing is not reaching everyone who needs it.”
The new analysis provides an in-depth look at trends in sexual risk behaviors among students by race and gender from 1991 to 2013, building upon data released last month on trends in sexual risk behaviors among all U.S. students. Data indicate that areas of progress in reducing sexual risk differ among various groups.
The proportion of black, Hispanic, and female students who have ever had sexual intercourse has declined throughout the 22-year time period, but progress has stalled in this area for white and male students.
Similarly, the analysis noted consistent declines in the proportion of black and Hispanic students who had multiple sexual partners, but found increases among white students since 2009. And following years of increases, condom use has now declined among sexually active female and black students, and stabilized among male, white, and Hispanic students, the researchers found.
“Protecting the health of America’s youth will require action not just from CDC, but also from parents, schools, health care providers, and communities,” Dr. Mermin said.
The new analysis will be presented on July 23 by Laura Kann, Ph.D., at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia. It is based on data from CDC’s National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a nationally representative survey, done every other year, of public and private school students in grades 9-12.
Key findings include:
  • HIV testing: Since 2005, the proportion of students who had ever had sexual intercourse and had been tested for HIV has remained stable (22 percent in 2013). During 2013, among those who had sexual intercourse, female students were more likely than male students to have been tested (27 percent vs. 18 percent), and black students (28 percent) were more likely to have been tested than white (20 percent) or Hispanic (21 percent) students. CDC recommends that adolescents and adults ages 13-64 years in the United States get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine medical care.
  • Ever had sexual intercourse: Overall, the proportion of U.S. high school students who ever had sexual intercourse declined from 1991 (54 percent) to 2001 (46 percent) and has stabilized since that time (47 percent in 2013). The proportion of male students who ever had sexual intercourse declined from 1991 (57 percent) to 1997 (49 percent), and has stabilized since that time (48 percent in 2013), while this percentage has consistently declined among female students since 1991 (from 51 percent to 46 percent). By race/ethnicity, the proportion of black and Hispanic students who ever had sexual intercourse has declined since 1991 (among black students, from 82 to 61 percent and among Hispanic students, from 53 to 49 percent); and, after an initial decline from 1991 to 2003, has stabilized since that time among white students (50 percent in 1991, 42 percent in 2003, and 44 percent in 2013).
  • Multiple partners: Overall, the proportion of students who had sexual intercourse with four or more partners during their lifetime decreased from 1991 (19 percent) to 2003 (14 percent) and has stabilized since that time (15 percent in 2013). The proportion who had multiple partners declined among male students from 1991 (23 percent) to 1997 (18 percent), and has since stabilized (17 percent in 2013), while this percentage has declined among female students since 1991 (from 14 percent to 13 percent in 2013). By race/ethnicity, the proportion who had multiple partners declined from 1991 to 2013 among black students (from 43 to 26 percent) and Hispanic students (from 17 to 13 percent); and after an initial decline from 1991 to 2009 among white students (from 15 percent to 10 percent), has increased since that time (to 13 percent in 2013).
  • Condom use: Overall, the proportion of sexually active students (students who had sexual intercourse during the three months before the survey) who reported that they or their partner used a condom the last time they had sexual intercourse increased from 1991 (46 percent) to 2003 (63 percent), but has declined since then (to 59 percent in 2013). Condom use among male students increased from 1991 (54 percent) to 2005 (70 percent), but has stabilized (66 percent in 2013). Among female students, condom use increased from 1991 to 2003 (from 38 percent to 57 percent), but has since declined (to 53 percent in 2013). Among black students, condom use increased from 1991 (48 percent) to 1999 (70 percent) but has declined to 65 percent in 2013. After an initial increase, condom use has stabilized among Hispanic and white students (among Hispanic students, from 37 percent in 1991 to 57 percent in 2003 and 58 percent in 2013; among white students, from 46 percent in 1991 to 63 percent in 2005 and 57 percent in 2013).
Despite substantial progress in reducing sexual risk behaviors among black students, including decreases in the proportion of black students who have ever had sex, risk remains higher among these students than among their white and Hispanic counterparts.
“African-American youth have made tremendous strides in protecting themselves. However, they continue to shoulder a disproportionate burden of HIV and STD infections,” said Stephanie Zaza, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health. “It’s important that we build on progress in reducing sexual risk behaviors among African-American students, while working to provide all young people with essential information, skills, and services to protect themselves from HIV and STDs.”
The YRBS does not measure some of the known social and economic determinants of risk behaviors, such as family income and education, so researchers cannot assess the degree to which these factors may account for the higher levels of risk behaviors among African-American youth in this study.
More information is available at www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom.
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We Can Stop HIV Latino campaign | Press Release | Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC

We Can Stop HIV Latino campaign | Press Release | Newsroom | NCHHSTP | CDC



Press Release

For immediate release: Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov

New CDC campaign urges Latinos to speak up about HIV



We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time inspires open discussion


We Can Stop HIV Latino Campaign poster

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today launched the We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign, a new national, bilingual communication campaign that encourages Latinos to talk openly about HIV with their families and friends. Although more than 220,000 Latinos are living with the virus, studies have found that many in the community do not talk openly about HIV risk, prevention, or testing.
“Latino leaders and community members agree that the stigma surrounding HIV creates a deafening silence. The reality is that HIV doesn’t go away when you don’t talk about it. This is a virus that thrives on secrecy and shame,” said Eugene McCray, M.D., director of CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. “The We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign aims to drive HIV out of the shadows.”
Developed with input from Latinos across the country and key Latino community organizations, the English and Spanish-language campaign materials feature a culturally diverse group of men and women talking openly about a range of HIV-related topics, including the impact of the epidemic within the Latino community, risk factors, and the importance of HIV testing.
The national campaign will reach millions of Latinos across the nation through online, print media, transit, and billboard advertising, as well as social media outreach. Partnerships with leading Latino-serving media outlets and organizations will help amplify bilingual campaign messages. The campaign will be featured this weekend at the People en Español Festival in San Antonio, TX and continue to be promoted at upcoming community events, including a September 4 event hosted in conjunction with MTV Tr3s in New York City.
“Many Latinos don’t talk about HIV – it’s just not something many of us are comfortable talking about,” said recording artist and campaign spokesman Henry Santos. “I’m proud to help break the silence – we all have to start speaking up so we can stop HIV.”
Latinos make up 16 percent of the U.S. population and account for 21 percent of new HIV infections each year. Research has shown that open communication about HIV increases knowledge about HIV risk, prevention, and testing. However, many Latinos are not having these important conversations, possibly because cultural norms foster silence about topics like sex. A recent study found that only about half of Latinos have talked with friends and family about HIV in the past year, and another found that even when Latinos are ready to talk about HIV, many do not have the information they need to have these life-saving conversations with loved ones.
We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time is the latest campaign of CDC’s Act Against AIDSinitiative, a national communication campaign to combat complacency about the HIV/AIDS crisis in the United States. The campaign helps advance the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, which calls for reducing new infections, reducing stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV, and educating Americans about the threat of HIV and how to prevent it. Other elements of the Act Against AIDS initiative that reach Latinos include Reasons/Razones, a national, bilingual campaign for gay and bisexual Latinos and Let’s Stop HIV Together/Detengamos Juntos el VIH, a national HIV awareness and anti-stigma campaign for all Americans.
For more information about We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time, please visitwww.cdc.gov/OneConversation.
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Nutrition Update

Nutrition Update

Nutrition Update

New on the MedlinePlus Nutrition page:
08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

08/19/2014 03:47 PM EDT

Germs and Hygiene Update

Germs and Hygiene Update



Germs and Hygiene Update

New on the MedlinePlus Germs and Hygiene page:
08/22/2014 02:31 PM EDT

Source: Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health