sábado, 22 de noviembre de 2014

CDC Releases Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance Report

CDC Releases Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance Report

Division of Reproductive Health Global Activity eUpdate

The Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance – United States, 2011



The Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance – United States, 2011 summary in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that was just released, presents state-specific data on assisted reproductive technology (ART) use and outcomes. The report compares ART infant outcome data with outcomes for all infants born in the U.S. in 2011, and provides data on the contributions of ART to total infants born, multiple birth infants, low birth weight infants, and preterm infants for each U.S. state, the District of Columbia,  and Puerto Rico. 
In 2011, approximately 47% of ART infants were born in multiple births compared with 3% among infants born in the general population. 
A greater proportion of ART infants were low birth weight (31%), and preterm (36%), compared with infants in the birth population overall (8% and 12%, respectively).
The full MMWR surveillance summary is available here. Clinic-specific ART success rates can be found here.

"Off-Label" Drug Use

www.consumerreports.org/health/resources/pdf/best-buy-drugs/money-saving-guides/english/Off-Label-FINAL.pdf





11/20/2014 02:45 PM EST


Source: Consumers Union of U.S.
Related MedlinePlus Page: Medicines

Toilet Training Children with Special Needs - HealthyChildren.org

Toilet Training Children with Special Needs - HealthyChildren.org

healthy children : Powered by pediatricians. Trusted by parents.





11/20/2014 02:09 PM EST
American Academy of Pediatrics: Dedicated to the Health of All Children

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics
Related MedlinePlus Page: Toilet Training

Health Tip: Change Your Skin Routine During Winter: MedlinePlus

Health Tip: Change Your Skin Routine During Winter: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health




Health Tip: Change Your Skin Routine During Winter

Avoid long, hot showers
By Diana Kohnle
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Related MedlinePlus Page
(HealthDay News) -- Healthy skin looks radiant, but it may need a little extra TLC during the winter months.
The American Osteopathic Association suggests these steps for healthier winter skin:
  • Since hot water can make skin lose moisture, take shorter warm showers and baths.
  • Use a gentle, light exfoliator to slough off dead skin cells.
  • Don't pick at or peel dry skin.
  • Switch to an oil-based moisturizer that includes sun protection factor. Reapply throughout the day if you'll be outside.
  • Run a humidifier to keep home air moist.
  • If your clothes get wet, remove them as soon as possible to avoid irritating the skin.
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Skin Conditions

Kids Born to Overweight Moms May Face Higher Heart Risks as Adults: MedlinePlus

Kids Born to Overweight Moms May Face Higher Heart Risks as Adults: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






Kids Born to Overweight Moms May Face Higher Heart Risks as Adults

But researchers add that eating behaviors mothers pass on might play greater role than genetics
Thursday, November 20, 2014
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Pages
THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight or obese women who get pregnant are much more likely to have a child who suffers from heart disease as an adult, new research suggests.
But it looks like environment may play a greater role than genetics in that trend, the researchers added.
"Mothers who are overweight teach behaviors, and those behaviors are passed on," said study author Dr. Michael Mendelson. He is a research fellow at the Framingham Heart Study, Boston University and the Boston Children's Hospital.
"There's been mounting evidence that maternal health before going into pregnancy has implications for her offspring," Mendelson added. "This shows there are a lot of good reasons to focus on the health and weight of young people before they go on to have children."
Researchers analyzed data on 879 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, the classic long-term, ongoing study of the heart health of people living in the town of Framingham, Mass.
About 10 percent of the mothers had been overweight, with a body-mass index of 25 or higher before pregnancy. That translates to a weight of 145 pounds or more for a 5-foot-4 woman.
During the 41-year span of the data, from 1971 to 2012, there were 193 cases of heart disease, stroke or heart failure, 28 heart-related deaths, and 138 total deaths among all the children.
Compared with adults whose mothers had not been overweight, the study found that offspring of overweight or obese mothers faced a 90 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease or death.
Even though the children's own risk factors accounted for some of the difference, Mendelson said there could also be a genetic component at play.
The children might be affected in their womb by their mothers' poor health, or both mother and child might have a genetic predisposition for heart problems and obesity, he explained.
But Dr. Martha Daviglus, a professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine and executive director of the Institute for Minority Health Research, said she thinks maternal overeating both affects the child in the womb and then creates a bad example as the child grows up.
"It's not genetics. It's mostly environmental," Daviglus said. "This transmission would not have happened if the mothers were able to control their weight and their food."
Currently, more than one-half of pregnant women in the Unites States are overweight or obese, according to online statistics from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
Mendelson said larger studies in other populations are needed to verify these findings, but added that the results highlight the need for efforts to reduce obesity among young women both before and during their childbearing years.
SOURCES: Michael Mendelson, M.D., research fellow, Framingham Heart Study, Boston University and the Boston Children's Hospital: Martha Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D., professor, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and executive director, Institute for Minority Health Research; Nov. 18, 2014, presentation, American Heart Association annual meeting, Chicago
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Heart Diseases
Obesity
Pregnancy

Could Your Job Help Preserve Your Aging Brain?: MedlinePlus

Could Your Job Help Preserve Your Aging Brain?: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






Could Your Job Help Preserve Your Aging Brain?

Mentally stimulating work may keep your mind sharp, research says
Thursday, November 20, 2014
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Pages
THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Jobs requiring intellectually challenging tasks may help preserve thinking skills and memory as workers age, a new study suggests.
The researchers compared IQ scores obtained around age 11 from more than 1,000 Scottish people with their memory and reasoning scores around age 70. The scientists found that those who had mentally stimulating jobs appeared to retain sharper thinking even years after retirement.
Researchers from the University of Edinburgh scored workers' jobs for their complexity with people, data and other things. Complex data jobs might involve coordinating or synthesizing data, for example. Less complex occupations might involve comparing or copying data.
In working with others, more complex occupations involve instructing, negotiating or mentoring. Less complex roles might involve taking instructions or helping.
"We see that those in more complex jobs generally do better on a range of cognitive ability measures," said study author Alan Gow, an assistant professor of psychology at Heriot-Watt University and the Centre for Cognitive Aging and Cognitive Epidemiology in Edinburgh, Scotland.
"That's not necessarily surprising ... but we were able to add an interesting twist [because] we had data on our participants' cognitive ability in childhood," Gow added.
Dr. David Knopman, vice chair of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council at the Alzheimer's Association, praised the "very nice and unique" new research, but pointed out that it was an observational study that could not prove that job complexity leads to better thinking skills as people age.
"But it says that the things we do during our lifetimes can make a difference for risk reduction for dementia, and that's a good thing," added Knopman, also a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Minnesota. "This is obviously not a quick fix. If someone is not using their brain in a stimulating, challenging way and suddenly decides to do so, that's not what this is saying [will work]."
The study was published online Nov. 19 in the journal Neurology.
Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, a deterioration of thinking skills, reasoning, judgment and ability to perform everyday activities. More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, according to the Alzheimer's Association.
Gow's study joins a growing body of research bolstering the notion of "cognitive reserve." That's the theory that a more stimulating mental environment helps protect thinking skills as people age despite possible brain deterioration.
Gow and his team analyzed various levels of job complexity using the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. Jobs scoring highly for the complexity of work with people, for example, are lawyer, social worker, surgeon and probation officer. Jobs scoring lower for complexity of work with people are factory worker, bookbinder, painter and carpet layer, according to the researchers.
For complexity of work with data, high-scoring jobs include architect, civil engineer, graphic designer and musician; lower-scoring jobs are construction worker, telephone operator or food server, the researchers reported.
Gow and Knopman both noted that people with higher IQ scores tend to gravitate toward more complex occupations. That makes it more difficult to discern whether high innate intelligence or job stimulation is a stronger factor in better brain aging.
Gow said study participants have been asked to return for further memory and reasoning tests between the ages of 70 and 76. He and his team can use those results to examine how occupational complexity affects these brain skills even farther out, as well as other lifestyle and environmental factors.
"It's all part of the broader research agenda which aims to better understand how cognitive abilities [thinking skills] change with age, and identify the factors that predict this," said Gow.
SOURCES: Alan Gow, Ph.D., assistant professor, psychology, Heriot-Watt University and the Centre for Cognitive Aging and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland; David Knopman, M.D., vice chair, Medical and Scientific Advisory Council, Alzheimer's Association, Chicago, and professor, neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minn.; Nov. 19, 2014, Neurology online
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Memory
Seniors' Health

A Bad Marriage Burdens an Aging Heart: MedlinePlus

A Bad Marriage Burdens an Aging Heart: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






A Bad Marriage Burdens an Aging Heart

Older women in unhappy relationships seem especially vulnerable, researchers say
By Robert Preidt
Thursday, November 20, 2014
HealthDay news image
THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A bad marriage increases an older adult's risk of heart trouble, and that's particularly true for women, a new study contends.
Researchers examined five years of data from 1,200 married American men and women, aged 57 to 85. People with spouses who were overly critical or demanding were more likely to develop heart disease than those with supportive mates, the researchers from Michigan State University said.
They also found that a bad marriage's harmful impact on heart health increased with age. This may be because marriage-related stress might stimulate more -- and more intense -- cardiovascular responses due to declines in immune function and increasing frailty as people age, the researchers speculated.
Women were more likely suffer poor heart health due to a bad marriage. One possible explanation: Women tend to internalize negative feelings, making them more likely to develop depression and heart problems, according to lead investigator Hui Liu, an associate professor of sociology.
The researchers also found that heart disease seems to lead to a decline in marriage quality for women, but not men. This finding is consistent with the widely held belief that wives are more likely to provide support and care to sick husbands, while husbands are less likely to do so for wives, the study authors said.
"In this way, a wife's poor health may affect how she assesses her marital quality, but a husband's poor health doesn't hurt his view of marriage," Liu explained in a university news release.
Liu added that the findings, published online Nov. 19 in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, demonstrate the need for marriage counseling and support for older couples.
"Marriage counseling is focused largely on younger couples. But these results show that marital quality is just as important at older ages, even when the couple has been married 40 or 50 years," she said.
The study was funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.
SOURCE: Michigan State University, news release, Nov. 19, 2014
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Family Issues
Heart Disease in Women
Seniors' Health