viernes, 24 de octubre de 2014

NIH media briefing on discharge of Ebola patient from its Clinical Center Special Clinical Studies Unit

NIH media briefing on discharge of Ebola patient from its Clinical Center Special Clinical Studies Unit



National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Turning Discovery Into Health



Institute/Center

Contact

Related Links

NIH media briefing on discharge of Ebola patient from its Clinical Center Special Clinical Studies Unit

What

NIH officials will brief reporters about the discharge of Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who was admitted to the NIH Clinical Center on October 16 with Ebola virus disease, and is now virus free.

Who

  • Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the National Institutes of Health
  • Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
  • H. Clifford (Cliff) Lane, M.D., NIAID Clinical Director
  • John I. Gallin, M.D., Director, NIH Clinical Center
  • Tara Palmore, M.D., Director, Hospital Epidemiologist, NIH Clinical Center and Director, Infectious Diseases Training Program, NIAID
  • Rick Davey, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director, NIAID Division of Clinical Research

When

11:30 AM ET in front of the NIH Clinical Center. The briefing will be live streamed:
http://videocast.nih.gov/live.asp?live=15096&preview=1

How

For logistics purposes, please RSVP to let us know if you plan to attend in person. NIH Visitors Map:http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx.
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.
NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®

CDC Around the World: October 24th is World Polio Day

CDC Around the World: October 24th is World Polio Day



CDC Around the World



IN THIS MESSAGE:
Photo of children vaccinated for polio
PHOTO OF THE WEEK
World Polio Day is October 24th. Let's end polio once and for all.View full-sized photo
Spotlighted Topic of the Week: Polio
CDC Ebola Updates
In the News
On the Calendar


Blog of the Week
GET TO KNOW A STOPPER
I was on the second Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) team in 1999, where I was stationed in Nepal for 3 months. When I finished my training with the Public Health Prevention Service in 2000, CDC’s polio program was the first place that I came to look for a job and I have been with the CDC Global Immunization Division ever since...read blog
Blog of the Week




Infographic of the Week
POLIO: WHAT YOU SEE IS ONLY THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG
Polio is sneaky, silent and highly contagious. It doesn’t respect boundaries or social class – it is an equal opportunity paralyzer. 
View full-sized infographic


Infographic of the week: Officials from 36 nations and 12 organizations are gathering in Jakarta, Indonesia, August 20-21, 2014, to further their commitments to the Global Health Security Agenda.









India is now Polio Free



Video of the Week
INDIA IS NOW POLIO FREE
India has not reported any case of polio since a two-year old girl got polio paralysis on 13 January 2011 in Howrah district of West Bengal. India’s victory over polio paves the way for polio-free certification of the South East Asia region of WHO…watch video


Story of the week

Story of the Week
VACCINE RESEARCH WILL ACCELERATE ERADICATION OF POLIO
The 21st century has seen a multitude of public health victories. Among them is the elimination of wild polio virus (WPV) in over 100 countries worldwide, thanks to successful vaccination programs. This is an important accomplishment because polio is a crippling and potentially deadly infectious disease…read story


CDC Ebola Updates
Latest Outbreak Info
The World Health Organization has reported 9935 cases of Ebola and 4877 deaths worldwide…read more

Q & A on Ebola

Distribution map showing districts and cities reporting suspect cases of Ebola






















CDC Announces Active Post-Arrival Monitoring for Travelers from Impacted Countries




In the News
How to Avert an Ebola Nightmare: Lessons From Nigeria's Victory
BloombergBusinessweek
October 20, 2014

CDC releases revised Ebola gear guidelines
ABC NEWSOctober 20, 2014

CDC takes to Twitter to answer Ebola concerns
CBS NewsOctober 8, 2014

Meet the disease detectives tracking Ebola at the CDCPBS NewsHour
October 8, 2014

Ebola outbreaks in Nigeria, Senegal appear contained, CDC reports
Fox News
October 1, 2014




On the Calendar
October 24: World Polio Day
October 29: World Stroke Day
November 12: World Pneumonia Day
November 14: World Diabetes Day
November 17: World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims
November 19: World Toilet DayNovember 19: International Men's Day
November 20: Universal Children's Day
November 20: World Chronic Obstructive Pulminary Disease Day

Opportunity for Public Comment - US Preventive Services Task Force

Opportunity for Public Comment - US Preventive Services Task Force

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force banner

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force posted today a draft Research Plan on screening for obesity and interventions for weight management in children and adolescents. The draft Research Plan is available for review and public comment from October 23 to November 19, 2014. To review the draft Research Plan and submit comments, go to http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/us-preventive-services-task-force-opportunities-for-public-comment.

BPA Exposure and Cash Register Receipts: MedlinePlus Health News Video

BPA Exposure and Cash Register Receipts: MedlinePlus Health News Video

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health




10/23/2014 09:43 AM EDT


Source: HealthDay - Video
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Environmental HealthOccupational Health

Seniors Should Remove Dentures at Bedtime: MedlinePlus

Seniors Should Remove Dentures at Bedtime: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






Seniors Should Remove Dentures at Bedtime

Study says sleeping with false teeth may raise risk of pneumonia
By Robert Preidt
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Pages
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who wear their dentures when they sleep are at increased risk for pneumonia, according to new research.
The study included 524 men and women, average age about 88, who were followed for three years. During that time, there were 28 hospitalizations and 20 deaths from pneumonia.
Among the 453 denture wearers, the 41 percent who wore their dentures when they slept were about twice as likely to develop pneumonia as those who removed their dentures at night, according to Toshimitsu Iinuma of Nihon University School of Dentistry in Japan, and colleagues.
The risk of pneumonia associated with wearing dentures at night is comparable with the high risk of pneumonia linked with mental impairment, history of stroke and respiratory disease, the researchers said.
The researchers also found that seniors who wore their dentures while sleeping were more likely to have problems such as tongue and denture plaque and gum inflammation, according to the study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of Dental Research.
The implications of the study findings are straightforward -- seniors should be told not to wear their dentures while they sleep, Frauke Mueller, of the University of Geneva in Switzerland, wrote in an accompanying commentary.
SOURCE: Journal of Dental Research, news release, Oct. 13, 2014
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Pneumonia
Seniors' Health

U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Access to Health Care: MedlinePlus

U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Access to Health Care: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Access to Health Care

Survey conducted prior to implementation of Affordable Care Act, however
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Page
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system ranks dead last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey.
The 2013 survey of the American health care landscape was conducted by the Commonwealth Fund just prior to the full implementation of the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act (ACA).
"I would say that we found two things that really seem to drive the higher barriers to health care in the U.S.," said David Squires, a senior researcher with the Commonwealth Fund in New York City.
"The first is that we have a huge uninsured population, which at least at the time of the survey was about 50 million people. And, the second is that we have millions more who have some kind of insurance, but the coverage isn't really good enough to protect them fully if they actually become ill," explained Squires.
"And these two issues don't really exist in any of the other countries we looked at. They all have universal health insurance," he noted. "So everyone has access and the insurance they have is generally much more protective. It covers more costs and either has no co-pays or relatively modest co-pays. And there's a ceiling on what a patient would have to pay in any one year, if anything," Squires said.
"That's a huge difference from the American experience. In addition, the U.S. is just a much more expensive health care system. We spend about $9,000 per person a year. That compares, for example, with just $3,000 a year in the U.K., and is overall about 50 to 200 percent more than is spent on our peers in other Western nations. So even if an American has insurance it's still in the context of an extremely expensive situation," Squires added.
The new survey is the subject of a perspective analysis, written by Karen Davis and Jeromie Ballreich of Johns Hopkins, and published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
The survey included Canada, Australia, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.
Of these, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland ranked highest in terms of access to care irrespective of personal wealth, the researchers found.
Perhaps not surprisingly, the survey showed that low-income Americans are particularly hardest hit by the financial burden of health care, according to the survey.
For example, the poll noted that compared with their peers in other countries, low-income Americans were more likely to skip seeing a doctor and/or forgo filling prescriptions, tests, treatment and follow-up care because of expense.
The survey concluded that at least three in 10 Americans say that money is a barrier to getting medical attention. This compared with roughly one in 10 among residents of the other countries polled, the report indicated.
Lower-income Americans were also more likely than peers in other nations to say they have to wait six days or more just to get an appointment with a primary care office, the survey found. Americans are also more likely to say they have to wait two hours or longer to be seen in a hospital ER, according to the survey.
The United States was also deemed through the survey as the poorest performer when it came to patients being able to get medical attention outside of daytime business hours.
While 15 percent of low-income Americans rate their doctor as either fair or poor, that figure is just 10 percent among low-income residents of other nations, the Hopkins' team noted.
Higher-income Americans, however, don't fare worse than their wealthy peers in other countries when it comes to getting appointments and ER care. And only 6 percent rated their doctor as fair or poor.
But, Americans in the middle income group (the so-called "above average income" group) were more likely than their peers in other nations to say that money is sometimes a barrier to care.
"This was before the major insurance expansions [due to the ACA] went into effect in the U.S.," acknowledged Squires. "So the millions who have since gotten insurance through exchanges or Medicare are not [reflected] in this survey, which means I think one way to read these findings is as a benchmark. The survey lays down where we were. And now future surveys will be able to measure the impact of the ACA."
The survey's real value is "in challenging the norms we think we have regarding so-called socialized medicine," said Katie Keith, the director of research with the Trimpa Group L.L.C., a political consulting and government relations firm.
"The conventional wisdom among the general [U.S.] public may be that in other countries people face long lines for care. But that's a misconception," she said. "The truth is that Americans are the ones who wait a lot longer for basic needs. Yes, for some elective surgeries in the U.K., maybe a patient will wait a bit more there than here. But for primary care it turns out that we're the ones standing in line."
SOURCES: David Squires, senior researcher, Commonwealth Fund, New York City; Katie Keith, J.D., M.P.H., director of research, Trimpa Group L.L.C., and former assistant research professor and project director, Center on Health Insurance Reforms, Health Policy Institute, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.; Oct. 23, 2014, New England Journal of Medicine
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Health Insurance

Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches, Scientists Report: MedlinePlus

Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches, Scientists Report: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health






Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches, Scientists Report

But experts find the study too small, problem too rare to be of concern
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
HealthDay news image
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests.
In a small number of people, the surgery was associated with a condition known as spontaneous intracranial hypotension -- or low blood pressure in the brain. The condition can trigger headaches while standing that disappear when lying down. These headaches can be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and difficulty concentrating, the researchers added.
But Dr. Mitchell Roslin, chief of bariatric surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said the study is too small to be able to draw any firm conclusions.
"You're talking about 11 people out of more than 300, and that's a low number," said Roslin, who had no part in the study. "The other thing that's strange is that these headaches showed up an average of 56.5 months after surgery, which is a long time.
"This would not be my concern if I was contemplating bariatric surgery," Roslin said.
The report was published online Oct. 22 in the journal Neurology.
Although it is not clear why this condition might develop after weight-loss surgery, the researchers speculated that significant weight loss alters pressure in the brain, which might uncover a pre-existing condition that causes fluid to leak from the spine and trigger severe headaches.
While the study showed an association between weight-loss surgery and an increased risk of severe headaches, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link.
For the study, a team led by Dr. Wouter Schievink, of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, studied 338 people with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. They compared these people with 245 people with unruptured intracranial aneurysms -- a weak spot in a blood vessel in the brain that can break and cause bleeding, another condition that can cause headaches.
The researchers found that 11 of those with spontaneous intracranial hypotension had weight-loss surgery, compared with two of those with intracranial aneurysms (3.3 percent versus 0.8 percent).
Among those who had weight-loss surgery, headaches started within three months to 20 years after the procedure.
Of the 11 people who had weight-loss surgery and spontaneous intracranial hypotension, treatment relieved the headaches in nine cases. Two patients continued to have headaches after treatment, the researchers found.
"It's important for people who have had bariatric surgery and their doctors to be aware of this possible link, which has not been reported before," Schievink said in a statement. "This could be the cause of sudden, severe headaches that can be treated effectively, but there can be serious consequences if misdiagnosed."
Dr. John Morton, chief of bariatric and minimally invasive surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, noted that obesity increases pressure in the brain and is a more common cause of headaches.
"When you carry excess weight, you have increased pressure in the brain," Morton explained.
In some patients, that increased pressure leads to headaches and even blindness, which are actually relieved by weight-loss surgery, he noted.
SOURCES: Mitchell Roslin, M.D., chief, bariatric surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; John Morton, M.D., chief, bariatric and minimally invasive surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.; Oct. 22, 2014, Neurology, online
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Weight Loss Surgery